The Dislocations of Cultural Translations Robert J. C. Young

In this article, Robert Young traces the political, cultural and intellectual atmosphere in which Homi Bhabha wrote The Location of Culture in London in the 1980s and early 1990s. Homi Bhabha is introduced as a cultural interpreter of the postcolonial perspective by linking colonial realities, ideas and representations to express the concerns of contemporary society through concepts such as hybrids and the third space. However, by linking cultural translation and blasphemy with his defense of Salman Rushdie, Homi Bhabha misses the reality of Muslims in general, and the Muslim minority in Britain in particular, which rejected cultural policies of major centers in the West. Robert Young concludes that The Location of Culture successfully challenged the normative ideas of Western modernity but has created more radical challenges in confronting them.

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In this article, Robert Young traces the political, cultural and intellectual atmosphere in which Homi Bhabha wrote The Location of Culture in London in the 1980s and early 1990s. Homi Bhabha is introduced as a cultural interpreter of the postcolonial perspective by linking colonial realities, ideas and representations to express the concerns of contemporary society through concepts such as hybrids and the third space. However, by linking cultural translation and blasphemy with his defense of Salman Rushdie, Homi Bhabha misses the reality of Muslims in general, and the Muslim minority in Britain in particular, which rejected cultural policies of major centers in the West. Robert Young concludes that The Location of Culture successfully challenged the normative ideas of Western modernity but has created more radical challenges in confronting them.

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